Print Workshop 28th October/4th Novermber

Last Tuesday was my first day in the print workshop. Having completed my four weeks in stitch and having learnt so much I was really looking forward to starting dying and printing. The first lesson started with paper stretching, using normal photocopy paper, we wetting the paper and then stuck them down with brown tape, this method would stop the paper from cockling when wet materials are used on it. We could then use batik, wax crayons, salt and dyes to create different patterns and marks on the papers. I really liked using the batik, I love the resist effect that it leaves behind; and I really liked that once the dye had been painted on the paper, if you put salt over the top, it would absorb the dye and leave a sort of speckled pattern behind.

Paper stretching, batik and dye samples

Paper stretching, batik and dye samples

Next week started to use screens. Using the same inks that we had used for the paper samples, we were show how to paint an image onto the pack of a silk-screen, and then once the paint had dried, how to transfer the image onto fabric. This was a very interesting method of printing. Once the image had been painted onto the back of the screen, we used a sort of binding paint, to push the ink off the screen and onto the fabric. The result was very impressive and interesting to produce. We also did some silk painting, firstly using batik to create a resist before painting onto the silk. Once the dyes had dried, the silk was then placed under the hot press to melt the wax, leaving behind the fabric that was protected from the dyes. I really love the method of batik and how each creation is a one-of-a-kind production.

Batik.

Batik.

Batik detail.

Batik detail.

Yesterday was my second session in the print workshop and we were creating heat transfers. This was where, using a specific ink, you painted a pattern or image onto a sheet of paper, and then placed the paper, and a piece of synthetic fabric, under the heat press. Making sure the dye on the paper was dry, the heat of the press would transfer the image form the paper onto the fabric.

Heat transfer.

Heat transfer.

Heat transfer.

Heat transfer.

 

Using leaves and feathers, I created patterns and images using stencilling and printing the leaves/feathers onto the paper, using harmonising colours that would look nice together. I then took theses papers to the heat press, and using the synthetic fabrics, transferred the images from the paper onto the fabric; each paper images should produce about 5 fabric transfers. We also did more work with batik yesterday, this time using acid dyes to paint the silk, again I love the method and the outcomes of batik. I’m looking forward to started shibori next week.

 

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