Mark-Making

On Monday I was set with the task of mark-making. Using a grid, which was drawn up on a double page of a A3 cartridge paper sketch book, I set to work thinking of all the different ways in which I could make marks, and the different materials I could use. So after a lot of staring at blank paper, looking through books, and after some failed ideas, one of which ended in setting fire to some paper, I give you mark-making.

20141003_121823125_iOS

Finished mark-making.

.

For each square of the grid I used a different mark-making technique, ending up with many different marks, which had been made in a variety of materials. I had decided to work in a monochromatic theme, with the idea that when using black and whites, the viewer would look at the actual marks, instead of what colours in which they were made.

I started by using graphite, and tinted graphite, as well as charcoal and pencils. I then moved on to using ink, fine-liner and watercolours. I then went on to explore oil pastels, oil paint and the marks that could be made using embroidery. I tried out lines and dashes, cross-hatching and dots, smudging and rubbing out, dripping and splashing water/watercolours, using anything I could find, like pen lids, the ends of pencils, rulers, cocktails sticks and leaves to apply the materials onto the grid.On two squares of the grid, I used the same mark-making of drawing rough circles, but in different materials, showing that even though I used the same technique, the results were anything but. I love the effect that it gives, to have so many different types of mark-making together, of being able to compare how they look and what they would look like together.

Watercolour splotches, ink pressed on with the end of a pencil, ink pressed on with the side of a pen lid, fine liner dripped wth water, lines and vertical lines in tinted charcoal.

Watercolour splotches, ink pressed on with the end of a pencil, ink pressed on with the side of a pen lid, fine liner dripped with water, lines and vertical lines in tinted charcoal.

Cross-hatching, dots, oil painted on with a cocktail stick and pencil lines.

Cross-hatching, dots, oil painted on with a cocktail stick and pencil lines.

 

Printed leaf using oil paint.

Printed leaf using oil paint.

One mark that I am particularly in love with is where  I used oil paint on a leaf and then printed it onto the paper. The spine of the leaf was left printed onto the paper, and because of the thickness and build-up of the paint that was on the leaf, a wonderful texture was left on the paper, so that not only could you see the spine of the leaf, you could feel it as well. I love the use of nature and natural elements in textile and I especially love the life that they bring into a piece of work.

I especially found this task to be quite useful. I like doing it and exploring different techniques and materials, but it has also given me an idea of the kind of things I could explore into further; the different materials I could use, the different methods and techniques; seeing which ones would work, which won’t and which ones could be a potential disaster.

 

Advertisements


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s